Current rates of Stamp Duty

Residential and non residential lands and buildings

The current Stamp Duty rates for residential and non-residential land and buildings are set out in the table below.

Stamp Duty rates on land and buildings
Type of propertyConsiderationRate of Stamp Duty

Residential

First €1 million

1%

Residential

Excess over €1 million

2%

Non-residential

-

7.5%

The 7.5% rate applies to instruments (written documents) executed on or after 9 October 2019. This rate was introduced in Budget 2020.

Budget 2020 provides for transitional arrangements. Under the arrangements:

  • where there is a binding contract in place before 9 October 2019
  • and
  • the instrument of transfer is executed before 1 January 2020
  • and
  • the instrument contains a certificate

you pay Stamp Duty at the pre-Budget rate of 6%.

The wording of the certificate is:

“It is hereby certified that this instrument was executed solely in pursuance of a binding contract entered into before 9 October 2019.”.

The  Finance Act 2017 increased the rate from 2% to 6% for instruments executed on or after 11 October 2017. That Act also provided for transitional arrangements. Under those arrangements a 2% rate of duty is chargeable on instruments executed before 1 January 2018:

  • where there is a binding contract in place before 11 October 2017
  • and
  • the instrument contains a certificate.

The wording of the certificate is:

"It is hereby certified that this instrument was executed solely in pursuance of a binding contract entered into before 11 October 2017."

Other non-residential property

You may have paid Stamp duty at the higher rate. If you did, you may now seek a refund if the transitional arrangement apply.

Apart from:

you also pay Stamp Duty on other non-residential property such as goodwill at the same rate that applies to transfers of land and buildings.

Mixed use property

If your property is part-residential and part non-residential, you apportion the consideration and apply:

  • the residential rate to the residential part
  • and
  • the non-residential rate to the non-residential part.

You should:

  • apportion on a just and reasonable basis
  • and
  • keep a record of how you reached the decision to apportion the consideration.

Next: Leases (including agreements for a lease)